Sunday, 22 November 2020

Carl Orff & Gunild Keetman & Margaret Murray ‎– Music For Children (Schulwerk) (2013)

Style: Educational, Folk, Nursery Rhymes
Format: CD, Vinyl, MP3
Label: Trunk Records

Tracklist:
VOLUME 1 
01.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Cuckoo, Where Are You?
02.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Pat-A-Cake
03.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Meena, Deena
04.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Name-calling
05.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Street Cries
06.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Tinker, Taylor
07.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Bobby Shaftoe
08.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Little Tommy Tucker
09.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Bye Baby Bunting
10.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Ring a Ring O' Roses
11.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Improvisation 1
12.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Improvisation 2
13.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Tommy's Fallen in the Pond
14.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Tom Tom the Piper's Son
15.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - My Little Pony Needs New Shoes
16.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - The Baker Is Baking
17.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Trees and Flowers
18.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Ensembles
19.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental for Tuned Glasses, Glockenspiel and Violoncello
20.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Ding, Dong
21.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - The Day Is Now Over
22.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Small Hand Drum
23.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Big Barrel Drum and Small Hand Drum
24.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Piece in 3/4 Time for Hand Drums, Barrel Drums and Wood Block
25.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - The Grand Old Duke Of York
26.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Oliver Cromwell
27.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - The Campbells Are Coming
28.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece i
29.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece ii
30.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece iii
31.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece iv
32.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece v
33.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece vi
34.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece vii
35.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Where Are You Going to My Pretty Maid?
36.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Alleluja
37.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Old Angus McTavish
38.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Rondo
39.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Boomfallera / Curly Locks

VOLUME 2
01.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Sleep, Baby Sleep
02.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Three Instrumental Pieces (For glockenspiels, matallphones and Violoncello)
03.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Cradle Song
04.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Ostinato Piece - In 4/4 Time
05.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Ostinato Piece - In 3/4 Time
06.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Ostinato Piece - In 4/4 Time part two
07.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Dance, Lassie Do
08.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Mary, Helen, Caroline
09.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Dance
10.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - A Farmer Went a Trotting
11.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Bear Dance
12.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Simple Simon
13.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Five Ostinato Pieces i)
14.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Five Ostinato Pieces ii)
15.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Five Ostinato Pieces iii)
16.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Five Ostinato Pieces iv)
17.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Five Ostinato Pieces v)
18.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Fabian, Sebastian
19.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Three Blind Mice
20.   Children of the Italia Conte School - O My Deir Hert
21.   Children of the Italia Conte School - O Hush Thee, My Babie
22.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Five Fools in a Barrow
23.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Percussion Exercises i) For Percussion Instruments
24.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Percussion Exercises ii) For Percussion Instruments
25.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Percussion Exercises iii) For Percussion Instruments
26.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Percussion Exercises iv) Stamping, Clapping and Knee Slapping
27.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Percussion Exercises v) For Drums
28.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Saint Matthie
29.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Thistles
30.   Children of the Italia Conte School - How to Treat a Horse
31.   Children of the Italia Conte School - A Tempest
32.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Apple Howlers Song
33.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Stones
34.   Children of the Italia Conte School - Witches Scene from Macbeth
35.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Summer Is Icumen In
36.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Instrumental Piece i
37.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Two Dances i)
38.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Two Dances ii)
39.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - King Herod
40.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece ii
41.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Girls and Boys Come Out to Play
42.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Flute Cadenza
43.   Chorus of the Children's Opera Group - Song for Good Friday
44.   Children's Instrumental Ensemble - Instrumental Piece iii

Credits:
Chorus Master – J. G. Wright, Margaret John
Composed By – Carl Orff, Gunild Keetman
Directed By – Carl Orff, Gunild Keetman, Walter Jellinek
Producer – Jonny Trunk

This is quite simply some of the most beautiful children's music ever made, with simple melodies and forgotten rhymes building gradually into more complex roundels and speech exercises. Performed by children in the late 1950s, this wonderful recording is educational, darkly nostalgic, and enchanting. History: This is the first time these important recordings have been in print since 1957. Their origins go back to the 1920s and the Günterschule in Munich, a progressive educational academy that specialized in music and exercise. Carl Orff was a teacher there, and worked on a new method of introducing children to music. Over the next few decades the "Orff Method" was developed and enhanced with the help of one of his former students Gunild Keetman. By the late 1950s the term "schulwerk" (literally "schooling" or "school work") had been adopted and with the inclusion of nursery rhymes and street cries it had spread across Europe as a popular education technique. A two LP recording was issued in Germany in 1957 to demonstrate some of the musical results -- this was followed by a pair of LPs issued in the UK, that were to include the music as well as early English nursery rhymes, songs and sayings. It is these recordings that are being issued here, along with the original and rare sleevenotes. The music is performed on what has since become known as "the Orff instruments": glockenspiels, xylophones, metallophones, drinking glasses, violoncello, bells, cymbals, drums, and the triangle. Rhythmic exercises are executed by hand-clapping, knee-slapping, feet-stamping, as well as using drums, whips, sand-rattles, and other percussion instruments. The spoken word is used for its meaning, its tone-color and rhythmic significance. Nursery rhymes familiar to most of us form a strong base to the album, but there are some here that you may have never come across before. Many of these date back to the 18th century, and Trunk also includes here the oldest song of all -- "Sumer Is Icumen In." Not only is the music absolutely captivating for adults and children alike, the CD comes with extensive 16-page sleeve notes explaining the origins of the songs and sayings. These are magical, rarely heard (and occasionally scary) recordings from the 1950s that highlight just how beautiful the simplest of all music can be. But the release also shows how incredible children's musical education once was. Performers: Chorus of the Children's Opera Group, Speech Ensemble from the Italia Conti School, and The Instrumental Ensemble.

Philip Glass From The Music Of David Bowie & Brian Eno ‎– "Low" Symphony (1993)

Style: Contemporary
Format: CD, Vinyl
Label: POINT MUsic

Tracklist:
1.   Subterraneans
2.   Some Are
3.   Warszawa

Credits:
Composed By, Liner Notes – Philip Glass
Assistant Conductor – Karen Kamensek
Principal Conductor – Dennis Russell Davies
Music By (From The Music Of) – Brian Eno, David Bowie
Orchestra, Performed By– The Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra
Written-By – Brian Eno , David Bowie
Produced By – Kurt Munkacsi, Michael Riesman

In which Philip Glass meets the vernacular and finds salvation. Or almost. But first, a few necessary points of clarification. The work on this disc is called the Low Symphony because the three movements it is made up of are developed from material 'borrowed' from a rock album made in 1975 by David Bowie and his then-collaborator, Brian Eno. The album was called ''Low'' and, even though there was no piece of music of that name included on it, Glass's re-working of three tracks from that name has been given that title, apparently with Bowie's blessing. 
I would unhesitatingly say that this is the most musical composition from Glass in many years. Depending on your Weltanschauung, that may mean a lot or mean nothing. In this work, the actual sound of the piece, and a firm grip on where it goes in the end, seems to be of more interest to the composer than the theory of how the notes got there in the first place. But then he is working with an original which delivers unusual material for a minimalist to work with: melody; direct emotion; a varied structure; a sense of drama. 
What is of overriding interest, however, is the use to which Glass puts these raw materials. For one, he has dispensed with the vocal renditions which were the core moments of two of the original pieces—Subterraneans and Warszawa; this music is purely orchestral. (One point worth at least noting is that Bowie is as big a magpie as Glass, having borrowed the main theme of Warszawa, completely intact, from Polish folk-music.) The other central point is that when Glass comes to develop the raw material he has inherited from Eno and Bowie, he immediately abandons the musical language of the original and dons the static rhythmic and harmonic patterns of the minimalist language he helped define. In that sense, the music shows its joins. 
The final point of main comment concerns Glass's actual arrangements. In each of the three movements, he provides the listener with an initial statement which is a close copy of the source material he is working from. However, it is never more than an approximation, and while this can be a positive thing, allowing the creative artist the aesthetic room from which to strike out into their own unique idiom, with Glass in this piece, there is an inevitable reduction in resonance from the original. I will give just a single example. The Low Symphony opens with a straightforward re-creation of the opening few minutes from Subterraneans, the last piece of music from Bowie's ''Low''. 
Yet it's not so straightforward. On the original, created entirely on synthesizers, the first theme is accompanied, and commented upon, by a distended, elliptical and entirely captivating series of descant melodic slivers (most of them emerging backwards), closer to Indian and Islamic music than anything else. Glass has not ignored these filigrees. On the contrary. But the solution to the problem of representing these within the context of an orchestra made up of conventional acoustic instruments is a rather lame major third tremolo sustained by the strings right the way through the initial exposition. The enigmatic quality of the original slips away. 
Other listeners could argue with conviction that Glass manages to create something new and musically valid from the materials he has picked. In a way, that is quite true: any artefact has finally to stand or fall on its own merits, or lack of them. And this work shows a stronger sense of traditional concerns such as form, harmonic movement and emotional impact than any other Glass I care to recall, so it certainly stakes a claim to be considered on its own. But then we come back to the name: Low Symphony. Glass wants us, the audience, to know where this music came from. He invites comparison. To which I can only answer that this is an encouraging—perhaps even courageous—work from a composer not usually given to the romance of music. But is it not ''Low''.'
kshadwick / Gramophone

Tosca ‎– Dehli9 (2003)

Style: Dub, Downtempo, Modern Classical
Format: CD, Vinyl
Label: G-Stone Recordings, !K7 Records

Tracklist:
1-01.   Oscar
1-02.   Me & Yoko Ono
1-03.   Gute Laune
1-04.   Mango Di Bango
1-05.   Wonderful
1-06.   Every Day & Every Night
1-07.   Dave Dudley
1-08.   Rolf Royce
1-09.   Sperl
1-10.   La Vendeuse Des Chaussures Des Femmes Part 1
2-01.   D-Moll (Session 1)
2-02.   Einschlaf (Session 2)
2-03.   Wien In E (Session 3)
2-04.   Schwimmer (Session 4)
2-05.   1504 / 7 (Session 5)
2-06.   Slow Hell (Session 6)
2-07.   Song (Session 7)
2-08.   Romanze In Es (Session 8)
2-09.   Fluß (Session 9)
2-10.   Ping (Session 10)
2-11.   2504 / 1 (Session 11)

Credits:
Mastered By – Bo Kondren
Written-By, Producer – Richard Dorfmeister, Rupert Huber

Tosca have been at it for a while now, delivering a mellow blend of funk fused dub since their early releases of Chocolate Elvis and Fuck Dub, back when the K&D sessions were yet to be released upon the unsuspecting public. And since the genre forming excitement of K&D’s remixes, much of Tosca’s releases have been relatively down played, becoming a secret passion for those truly in love with the sounds coming from the G-stone stable.

Truth be known though, the duo consisting of Richard Dorfmeister and Rupert Huber have been rather prolific since those early singles, releasing long players such as Opera and Suzuki, as well as a slew of remix compilations of tunes from those albums (Suzuki in Dub and Different Taste of Honey). And this year the pair have released yet another winner in the form of Delhi9, pushing their sound even further into the sparse regions of instrumental dub groove.

The sounds are definitely a little different from past releases, with most of the bass being played on a warm electronic fretless bass, and the melodies sounding fresh with piano, organ and flute tones, all still dubbed up with filtered echo’s as per their usual style. There is also a larger assortment of vocalist, with the return of Anna Clementi, plus the introduction of Tweed on the brilliant dub house tune Gute Loune, and Earl Zinger on the first single Wonderful.

Some who know me personally might say that I could not objectively write a review of Tosca’s material… but what do they know. I think the album is bloody brilliant. It’s a lovely mix of trip hop, acid jazz, dub house and bossa groove, and while all that might sound a bit much, the coherency of the instrumentation provides a flow from tune to tune that leaves the hips rocking like waves on a summer beach. And just to prove my contemporaries wrong, there is in my opinion one dud – on the Anna Clementi sung Me & Yoko Ono, Tosca find themselves being
quirky rather than kinky… I prefer kinky but that’s just me.

So all up a good buy and another quality release from the G-stone label. And you also get a second cd, which contains minimal piano arrangements written by Rupert Huber, and dubbed up by Dorfmeister, which is also a beautiful listen. Top job lads, bring on the remixes I say.

Tosca have been at it for a while now, delivering a mellow blend of funk fused dub since their early releases of Chocolate Elvis and Fuck Dub, back when the K&D sessions were yet to be released upon the unsuspecting public. And since the genre forming excitement of K&D’s remixes, much of Tosca’s releases have been relatively down played, becoming a secret passion for those truly in love with the sounds coming from the G-stone stable.

Truth be known though, the duo consisting of Richard Dorfmeister and Rupert Huber have been rather prolific since those early singles, releasing long players such as Opera and Suzuki, as well as a slew of remix compilations of tunes from those albums (Suzuki in Dub and Different Taste of Honey). And this year the pair have released yet another winner in the form of Delhi9, pushing their sound even further into the sparse regions of instrumental dub groove.

The sounds are definitely a little different from past releases, with most of the bass being played on a warm electronic fretless bass, and the melodies sounding fresh with piano, organ and flute tones, all still dubbed up with filtered echo’s as per their usual style. There is also a larger assortment of vocalist, with the return of Anna Clementi, plus the introduction of Tweed on the brilliant dub house tune Gute Loune, and Earl Zinger on the first single Wonderful.

Some who know me personally might say that I could not objectively write a review of Tosca’s material… but what do they know. I think the album is bloody brilliant. It’s a lovely mix of trip hop, acid jazz, dub house and bossa groove, and while all that might sound a bit much, the coherency of the instrumentation provides a flow from tune to tune that leaves the hips rocking like waves on a summer beach. And just to prove my contemporaries wrong, there is in my opinion one dud – on the Anna Clementi sung Me & Yoko Ono, Tosca find themselves being
quirky rather than kinky… I prefer kinky but that’s just me.

So all up a good buy and another quality release from the G-stone label. And you also get a second cd, which contains minimal piano arrangements written by Rupert Huber, and dubbed up by Dorfmeister, which is also a beautiful listen. Top job lads, bring on the remixes I say. 
Wayne Leslie / Resident Advisor