Monday, 24 February 2020

Osamu Kitajima ‎– Dragon King (1981)

Style: Fusion, Jazz-Funk, Contemporary Jazz
Format: CD, Vinyl
Label: Everland Psych, Arista, Alfa Records

Tracklist:
A1.   Hot Strings Invasion 津軽攻め
A2.   Lake Spirit 湖心
A3.   Say You Will セイ・ユー・ウィル
A4.   Share My Love シェア・マイ・ラブ
B1.   Dragon King 竜王
B2.   Willow Pattern 柳模様
B3.   Yamamé 山女

Credits:
Arranged By (Rhythm Arrangements) – Osamu Kitajima
Arranged By (String & Rhythm Arrangements) – Richard Evan
Engineer – Larry Hirsch
Executive-Producer – Kuni Murai, Sho Kawazao
Producer – Osamu Kitajima, Richard Evans

Duke Ellington • Charlie Mingus • Max Roach ‎– Money Jungle (1962)

Genre: Jazz
Format: CD, Vinyl
Label: Blue Note, United Artists Jazz

Tracklist:
1.   Money Jungle
2.   Le Fleurs Africaines (African Flower)
3.   Very Special
4.   Warm Valley
5.   Wig Wise
6.   Caravan
7.   Solitude

Credits:
Bass – Charlie Mingus
Drums – Max Roach
Piano – Duke Ellington
Producer – Alan Douglas
Written-By – D. Ellington

Duke Ellington surprised the jazz world in 1962 with his historic trio session featuring Charles Mingus and Max Roach. Not in a mood to simply rework older compositions, the bulk of the LP focused on music he wrote specifically for the session. "Money Jungle" is a thunderous opener, a blues that might be classified somewhere between post-bop and avant-garde. The gem of the date is the fragile, somewhat haunting ballad "Fleurette Africaine," where Mingus' floating bassline and Roach's understated drumming add to the mystique of an Ellington work that has slowly been gathering steam among jazz musicians as a piece worth exploring more often. "Very Special" is a jaunty upbeat blues, while the angular, descending line of "Wig Wise" also proves to be quite catchy. Ellington also revisits "Warm Valley" (a lovely ballad indelibly associated with Johnny Hodges) and an almost meditative "Solitude." Thunderous percussion and wild basslines complement a wilder-than-usual approach to "Caravan." Every jazz fan should own a copy of this sensational recording session.
Ken Dryden / AllMusic